21 Days in Normandy

Maj. Gen. George Kitching and the 4th Canadian Armoured Division

Angelo Caravaggio

* Narrative and analysis of the role of 4th Canadian Armoured Division in the Normandy campaign

* Examination of their role in Operations Totalize and Tractable, with detailed insight into the planning and orders for these operations.

* Reappraisal of the performance of the Division and particularly of their commander, Mag Gen Kitching, previous
Date Published :
March 2017
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Language:
English
Illustration :
16 b/w maps, approx. 25 photos
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Hardback
ISBN : 9781473870710
Pages : 336
Dimensions : 9.5 X 6.5 inches
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In stock
$34.95

Overview
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The Canadian 4th armored division crossed the Channel in July 1944 to reinforce the invading forces and assist in the Allied attempts to breakout of the Normandy beachhead around. They were heavily engaged in Operation Totalize and Operation Tractable but have been criticized for their failure to close the ‘Falaise gap’ and complete the entrapment of withdrawing German forces. Their commander, Major General George Kitching, was relieved of his command after just 21 days in action.

Angelo Caravaggio reexamines the division’s performance and particularly that of its leadership. Using new information, he establishes that, despite entering battle for the first time during one of the most challenging phases of Allied operations in August 1944, the 4th Armored Division, under Kitching’s leadership proved resilient and adaptive in overcoming the volatile and unpredictable nature of warfare in Normandy. The combat operations of August 1944 transformed the division into a battle-hardened combat formation that would later distinguish itself through its ability to generate a sustained drive across France out of the chaos and destruction of the Normandy battles.

About The Author
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Lt. Col (retired) Caravaggio served in the Canadian Armed Forces for 34 years. and was the first Director of the Centre for National Security Studies.He was appointed to the Order of Military Merit (Officer) in 1999 and is an alumnus of the Governor Generals Canadian Leadership Conference 2004. Dr Caravaggio has a Ph. D in Canadian history from Wilfrid Laurier University, a Masters Degree in War Studies, and a Masters Degree in Defence Studies from the Royal Military College of Canada. His article The Attack at Taranto: Tactical Success Operational Failure was the 2007 Edward S. Miller Award winner for best historical essay published in the U.S. Naval War College Review.Lt. Col (retired) Caravaggio served in the Canadian Armed Forces for 34 years. and was the first Director of the Centre for National Security Studies.He was appointed to the Order of Military Merit (Officer) in 1999 and is an alumnus of the Governor Generals Canadian Leadership Conference 2004. Dr Caravaggio has a Ph. D in Canadian history from Wilfrid Laurier University, a Masters Degree in War Studies, and a Masters Degree in Defence Studies from the Royal Military College of Canada. His article The Attack at Taranto: Tactical Success Operational Failure was the 2007 Edward S. Miller Award winner for best historical essay published in the U.S. Naval War College Review.

REVIEWS
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“His argument is detailed and based upon in-depth research, and the book has many detailed maps to help the reader follow the action.”

- WWII History, December 2017

The author uses new information to demonstrate the unit did show flexibility and adapted to the battlefield quickly, despite being thrown into battle during one of the Norman Campaign's critical phases. His arguments are detailed and based upon in-depth research, and the book has many detailed maps to help the reader follow the action.

- WWII History

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