Barbarossa Through Soviet Eyes

The First Twenty-Four Hours

Artem Drabkin, Christopher Summerville, Alexei Isaev

22 June 1941 changed the direction of World War II and of human history. Now, for the first time in English, Russians speak of their experiences on that fatal Sunday. Apparently caught off guard by Hitler's initiative, the Soviets struggled to make sense of a disaster that had seemingly struck from nowhere.
Date Published :
July 2012
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Language:
English
Illustration :
over 30 illustrations
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Hardback
ISBN : 9781844159239
Pages : 224
Dimensions : 9 X 6 inches
-
+
In stock
$32.95

Overview
-

22 June 1941 changed the direction of the Second World War. It also changed the direction of human history. Unleashing a massive, three-pronged assault into Soviet territory, the German army unwittingly created its own nemesis, forging the modern Russian state in the process. Thus, for most Russians, 22 June 1941 was a critical point in their nation's history. After the first day of ‘Barbarossa’ nothing would be the same again – for anyone. Now, for the first time in English, Russians speak of their experiences on that fatal Sunday. Apparently caught off guard by Hitler’s initiative, the Soviets struggled to make sense of a disaster that had seemingly struck from nowhere. Here are generals scrambling to mobilize ill-prepared divisions, pilots defying orders not to grapple with the mighty Luftwaffe, bewildered soldiers showing individual acts of blind courage, and civilians dumbstruck by air raid sirens and radio broadcasts telling of German treachery.

About The Author
-

Artem Drabkin is an author and historian.

Aleksei Isaev was born in 1974. Since the year 2004 up to the present date, he has written approximately 20 books on the history of the Eastern Front in the Second World War, with a particular emphasis on the events of 1941 and Stalingrad. His particular research interest today is the war’s final period. In the years 2007-2010, he worked as an academic scholar in the Russian Ministry of Defense’s Institute of Military History. He was a contributor to the new 12-volume official Russian history of the war. Thanks to the opening of the previously classified military archives in Russia, since then he has done a lot of work with the war’s documents as an independent scholar.

REVIEWS
-

"The title tells it all. Barbarossa Through Soviet Eyes: The First Twenty-Four Hours recounts the first day of Nazi Germany’s attack on Soviet Russia – Sunday, 22 June 1941. But don’t expect a dry distillation of strategic events and principal players. Authors Artem Drabkin and Alexei Isaev instead competently convey the chaos and confusion of combat through historical notes amidst gritty, often brutal personal recollections. Through Christopher Summerville’s lively English version, we learn much minutiae of the day itself. On the ground. In the air. On the sea. Attitudes. Expectations. Experiences. Even food, weather and, believe it or not, “hobby groups – aircraft modeling”! Surprises abound. How did Soviet troops, for instance, spot German infiltrators? How did some villages react? How did some Soviets escape envelopment and capture? And what was the first confirmed Soviet air-to-air victory? I won’t spoil things. Available through Casemate in North America, this informative, illustrated, entertaining effort promises many surprises. So grab it. And trace Barbarossa’s first hours through the eyes of everyday Soviets suddenly thrust into savage circumstances."

- Cybermodeler

More from this publisher