Day of the Panzer

A Story of American Heroism and Sacrifice in Southern France

Jeff Danby

 
Date Published :
April 2021
Publisher :
Casemate
Language:
English
Illustration :
44 b/w photos
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Binding. : Paperback
ISBN : 9781612009971
Pages : 384
Dimensions : 9 X 6 inches
Stock Status : In stock
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$24.95

Overview
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A highly rated, vivid and readable account of U.S. tanks in action in 1944 based on six years of research, interviews and battlefield visits.

“[An] excellent popular history . . . a sprightly and evocative tribute to the troops of Operation Dragoon” - Publishers Weekly

This is a rarely detailed, “you are there” account of World War II combat, describing a brief but bloody tank/infantry action in August 1944. Based on six years of research—drawing from interviews, primary documents, and visits to the battlefield—The Day of the Panzer transports the reader into the ranks of L Company, 15th Regiment, Third Infantry Division, and its supporting M4s of the 756th Tank Battalion as they grapple head-on with the Wehrmacht.

On August 15, 1944, L Company hit the beaches in southern France, joined by the tank crews of 2nd Lt. Andrew Orient’s 3rd Platoon, all veterans of Cassino. Despite logistical problems, the Third Division forged north through the Rhône River valley, L Company and its supporting tanks leading the regimental charge—until they faced a savage counterattack by the Germans and a rampaging Panther tank...

In this book, the minute-by-minute confusion, thrill, and desperation of WWII combat is placed under a microscope, as if the readers themselves were participants. “Through his well-wrought prose, Danby paints a detailed picture of deadly fighting and stunning victory” - WWII History

“One of the most interesting and absorbing battles histories that this reviewer has ever read...remarkably realistic and personal.” — History Book Club

“The excellent descriptions of infantrymen, tankers and supporting troops from the 15th’s Cannon Company using M8 self-propelled howitzers and the three inch gun armed M10s of the 601st Tank Destroyer Battalion make for good reading.” —War History Online.

About The Author
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Jeff Danby was born in Pontiac, Michigan. As the son of a high school history teacher, Jeff grew up in a house full of books—which he read voraciously. He went on to get a B.A. Degree in History (with Honors) from DePaul University with a concentration in 20th Century America. Jeff currently lives in Granville, Ohio, with his wife Melinda and three children. He is an active member of the 756th Tank Battalion Association and maintains the organization's website. He also maintains memberships in the Society of Third Infantry Division, and the 15th Infantry Regiment Association.

REVIEWS
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“…one of the most interesting and absorbing battle histories that this reviewer has ever read...remarkably realistic and personal…”

- History Book Club

"...riveting...very well done and gives the reader a much broader vision of the "forgotten" Invasion of France".

- IPMS/USA

"… a gripping story of initiative and confusion (on both sides) competently told and one that shows the details of extensive research… delivers the nitty gritty…"

- Russ Lockwood, Magweb.com

“…makes a major contribution to our understanding of American infantry in Europe.”

- Michigan War Studies Review

“…clearly written, pacey and exciting whilst giving a clear account of the sequence of events, a first hand perspective and a “flow” that keeps one keen to thumb over the next page.”

- Military Modelling

"Danby resurrects the forgotten campaign of World War II in this excellent popular history... a sprightly and evocative tribute to the troops of Operation Dragoon."

- Publisher’s Weekly

"...a powerful, punchy story…outs the reader in the middle of a raging battlefield populated with humans who far transcend the one dimensional paper soldiers often found in military history…"

- Stone & Stone Second World War Books

“Through his well-wrought prose, Danby paints a detailed picture of deadly fighting and stunning victory.”

- WWII History

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