The Battles of Antiochus the Great

The failure of combined arms at Magnesia that handed the world to Rome

Graham Wrightson

Through an analysis of the Seleucid army, the inherited standard tactics of Macedonian-style armies reliant on the sarissa phalanx, and a detailed examination of the three main battles of Antiochus III, this book will show how it was his failure to utilize combined arms at its fullest realization that led to utter defeat at Magnesia.
Date Published :
March 2022
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Language:
English
Illustration :
16 mono illustrations
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Binding. : Hardback
ISBN : 9781526793461
Pages : 184
Dimensions : 9.1 X 6.1 inches
Stock Status : In stock
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$34.95
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Overview
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Antiochus III, the king of the Seleucid Empire for four decades, ruled a powerful state for a long time. He fought and won many battles from India to Egypt, and he lost almost as many. Compared with most of the other Hellenistic monarchs of Macedonian-founded kingdoms, Antiochus had a greater variety of units that he could field in his army. He was in a unique position among the other kings because he had access to the traditional infantry-based Greek cultures in Asia Minor as well as the cavalry-dominant cultures of Mesopotamia and Western Asia. Yet, despite these advantages, Antiochus repeatedly came up short on the battlefield and his tactical shortcomings were no more obviously laid bare than at the Battle of Magnesia-ad-Sipylum in 190 BC. There his huge combined army, one of the largest ever fielded by Hellenistic rulers, was soundly thrashed by the smaller Roman force.

Through an analysis of the Seleucid army, the inherited standard tactics of Macedonian-style armies reliant on the sarissa phalanx, and a detailed examination of the three main battles of Antiochus III, this book will show how it was his failure to utilize combined arms at its fullest realization that led to such a world-changing defeat at Magnesia.

About The Author
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Graham Wrightson is Assistant Professor of Ancient Greek Military History at South Dakota State University (USA). His research interests focus on ancient warfare and military, in particular ancient Greek military history (Alexander and his successors) and the Crusades, as well as medieval history and medieval England.

REVIEWS
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“This well-written analysis of Macedonian and Successor warfare examines the strengths and weaknesses of the sarissa-armed phalanx using Antiochus' campaigns as a focus…  It's a gem of a book on phalanx warfare.”

- Historical Miniatures Gaming Society

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