Codebreakers

Stephen Twigge

The book reveals the story of British Codebreakers from the reign of Elizabeth I to the Cold War. It explores the use of ciphers during the Napoleonic wars, the role of the Royal Mail's Secret Office and the activities the Admiralty's ‘Room 40' leading to the creation of the Government's Code and Cypher School.
Date Published :
April 2020
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Series :
Images of the The National Archives
Illustration :
Black and white illustrations
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Paperback
ISBN : 9781526730800
Pages : 144
Dimensions : 9.5 X 7.5 inches
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$26.95
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Overview
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The book reveals the story of British Codebreakers from the reign of Elizabeth I to the Cold War. It explores the use of ciphers during the Napoleonic wars, the role of the Royal Mail’s Secret Office and the activities the Admiralty’s ‘Room 40’ leading to the creation of the Government’s Code and Cypher School.

The main theme of the book are the events of the Second World War and the battle to break the German enigma codes. The center of Britain’s codebreaking operation was located at Bletchley Park in rural Buckinghamshire and it was from here that a hastily assembled army of codebreakers battled to decipher Nazi Germany’s secret wartime communications. The deciphered high-level signals intelligence was known as Ultra and had a major influence on the outcome of the war, most notably contributing to crucial successes in the battle for the Atlantic and the D-Day landings in June 1944.

The book also reveals the work undertaken in the Far-East and the allied efforts to break the Japanese military cipher code named Purple. The book ends with a re-assessment of the work undertaken by the British code breaker and mathematician Alan Turing and a brief overview of the codebreaking operations undertaken by GCHQ during the formative period of the Cold War.

About The Author
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Stephen is a senior historian at The National Archives. He obtained his PhD from the Centre of Science, Technology and Medicine at the University of Manchester and was a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Department of International Politics, University of Wales, Aberystwyth. During his time at The National Archives, Stephen completed a four-year secondment at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office where he was responsible for editing three volumes of documents on British Policy Overseas, the official record of British foreign policy. Stephen is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and a member of the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Peer Review College. He has published a number of books and articles on the Cold War and has made regular media appearances to discuss record releases at The National Archives.

REVIEWS
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"... a chance for those of us unlikely to get to the British National Archives to glimpse some of the official documents kept there."

- The Spectrum Monitor

"For a short overview of British Intelligence work, focusing mainly on the Second World War, this book is a valuable introduction to the labyrinthine world of intelligence, codes and codebreaking. Any person needing more details information is referred to a bibliography in the back listing classic as well as more up to date works on the subject. This is a worthwhile addition to any library."

- Andy Nunez, Editor, 'Against the Odds'

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