The Roman Imperial Succession

John D Grainger

John D Grainger analyses the Roman imperial succession, demonstrating that the empire organized by Augustus was fundamentally flawed in the method it used to find emperors. Augustus' system was a mixture of heredity, senatorial and military influences, and these were generally antagonistic.
Date Published :
June 2020
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Illustration :
100 black and white illustrations
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Binding. : Hardback
ISBN : 9781526766045
Pages : 256
Dimensions : 9.25 X 6 inches
Stock Status : In stock
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$34.95
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Overview
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John D Grainger analyses the Roman imperial succession, demonstrating that the empire organized by Augustus was fundamentally flawed in the method it used to find emperors. Augustus’ system was a mixture of heredity, senatorial and military influences, and these were generally antagonistic. Consequently the Empire went through a series of crises, in which the succession to a previous, usually dead, emperor was the main issue. The infamous ‘Year of the Four Emperors’, AD 69, is only the most famous of these crises, which often involved bouts of bloody and destructive civil war, assassinations and purges. These were followed by a period, usually relatively short, in which the victor in the ‘crisis’ established a new system, juggling the three basic elements identified by Augustus, but which was as fragile and short lived as its predecessor; these ‘consequences’ of each crisis are discussed. The lucid and erudite text is supported by numerous genealogical tables and dozens of depictions of emperors.

About The Author
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John D Grainger is a former teacher and historian of great experience with a particular interest in Classical and Hellenistic Greek history.

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