In the Eye of the Storm

George V and the Great War

Alexandra Campbell

George V was largely an unknown entity to both his ministers and his people at the outbreak of war in 1914. By the end of the decade he had become the most visible and accessible Sovereign in British history. He had survived the "Crash of Thrones,” as it was dubbed by Herbert Asquith that toppled his cousins: the Kaiser and the Tsar.
Date Published :
November 2018
Publisher :
Helion and Company
Language:
English
Illustration :
1 b/w map & 67 b/w photos
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Hardback
ISBN : 9781911628262
Pages : 414
Dimensions : 9.75 X 6.75 inches
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In stock
$49.95

Overview
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George V was largely an unknown entity to both his ministers and his people at the outbreak of war in 1914. By the end of the decade he had become the most visible and accessible Sovereign in British history. He had survived the “Crash of Thrones,” as it was dubbed by Herbert Asquith that toppled his cousins: the Kaiser and the Tsar. Pioneering modern public relations he had not only established the House of Windsor in name, but in the hearts of his people; establishing a blueprint for the modern monarchy that is still followed today.

In depth coverage of George V’s war work wipes out assumptions about his capability as a sovereign and his suitability for the role. It also reveals that the Sovereign took less time off than an ordinary private soldier in the years 1914-18. Throughout, it forms a detailed overview of life on the Home Front in the Great War through the eyes of a King; a much more balanced interpretation of a country at war than the usual focus on fighting on the Western Front and those killed in battle.

The image of the King and Queen Mary as distant, cold parents is debunked in full and the book also includes a wealth of new material about their youngest son, Prince John. Also reconsidered is the possibility of Nicholas II’s asylum in Britain following the Russian Revolution from George V’s point of view.

To mark the 100th anniversary of the Armistice, the King’s war legacy is examined. He played a key role in the introduction of the two minute silence and the unveiling of the cenotaph. He was the chief mourner at the burial of the unknown soldier and became the first battlefield tourist when he toured the Western Front in the company of those that won the war. Battlefield pilgrims today are walking in his footsteps.

About The Author
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Alexandra Campbell was among a handful of girls who, in the early 1980s, exchanged a convent education for Eton College, from where she gained an Exhibition to Oxford to read Modern Languages (German and Italian) at St Hilda’s College. Upon graduation, Alex pursued a City career on the European Equities desks of two global banks - Kleinwort Benson and the Swiss Bank Corporation - but later moved into financial public relations. Subsequently, she became a parliamentary researcher and editor, and has recently been involved in a number of writing projects: she has contributed to a book on William Waldorf Astor for Flammarion in Paris and is currently researching for further biographies set during the First World War and the early 20th century. In 2015, she delivered the Founder’s Day speech at Dryburgh Abbey for the Royal British Legion of Scotland. Coincidentally, her father won an MC in Italy in 1945 while serving with the Lothians and Border Horse Yeomanry - Esmond Elliot’s first regiment after Eton. She is married with three children and lives in London.

REVIEWS
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"A good read for anyone with an interest in the Great War or any royalty watcher."

- StrategyPage

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