Monty And Patton

Two Paths to Victory

Michael Reynolds

Neither Monty nor Patton were pleasant people. They did not like the other very much, but their ambitious and calculating personalities make them fantastic subject material. Reynolds includes their contributions to the victory in North Africa and Europe as well as a superb overview of their respective command.
Date Published :
August 2010
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Language:
English
Illustration :
32 pages b/w plates
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Paperback
ISBN : 9781848841260
Pages : 352
Dimensions : 9.5 X 6 inches
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In stock
$22.95

Overview
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Michael Reynold’s account compares the lives of Allied generals Bernard Montgomery and George Patton. Born two years apart, both were commissioned within a year of each other and both were wounded in France in the First World War. Both men encompassed very different but very valuable characteristics in combat: Monty-careful and meticulous, Patton-dashing and diplomatic.

Despite the differences, both generals demonstrated striking similarities: commitment to their careers, a ruthless egotism, interesting when you consider neither held superior command. This did not impede their desire for the limelight and fame in warfare, arrogance and the manipulation of colleagues in high places to advance their careers. Both were machiavellian in their own affairs and self-interested in their own personal progression.

Neither Monty nor Patton were pleasant people, they did not like the other very much, but their ambitious and calculating personalities make them fantastic subject material. Reynolds includes their contributions to the victory in North Africa and Europe as well as a superb overview of their respective command.

About The Author
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Major General Michael Reynolds CB joined the British Army in 1948, and was commissioned into the Queens Royal Regiment in 1950. In the course of a long and distinguished career, he served in Korea, where he was severely wounded, Northern Ireland and West Germany. On promotion to Major General he assumed command of NATO's Allied Command Europe Mobile Force (Land). In retirement, he became guest speaker on British Army and NATO battlefield tours in the Ardennes, publishing a number of detailed histories on World War 2 operations in Europe. He died in 2015.

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