Passchendaele: Pen and Sword Military Classics

Philip Warner

 
Date Published :
January 2006
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Language:
English
Illustration :
16 pages of illustrations
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Binding. : Paperback
ISBN : 9781844153053
Pages : 272
Dimensions : 7.75 X 5 inches
Stock Status : In stock
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$19.99
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Overview
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Nearly seventy years ago, on 31st July 1917, the small Belgian village of Passchendaele became the focus for one of the most grueling, bloody and bizarre battles of World War 1. By 6th November, when Passchendaele village and the ridge were captured, over half a million British, French, Canadians, Australians, New Zealanders and Germans had become casualties.

Philip Warner, the noted historian of twentieth-century warfare and the author of over fifty books on military history, many published by Pen and Sword, has skillfully brought together all the elements of this horrific campaign - the historical background, personal accounts, strategies and tactics, the personalities and the political maneuvers. He investigates the issues which had a crucial effect on the course of the battle, including the mutinous state of the French army, the bombardment which destroyed the drainage system, Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig's determination to continue operations despite the appalling weather and ground conditions, and the stormy relationship between Haig and Lloyd George.

However, it is the determined fighting ability and the bravery of the allied soldiers, rather than the tactical plans of the commanders, that dominate this detailed and totally absorbing account of the harrowing four-month campaign called the Battle of Passchendaele.

Passchendaele is a masterly and timely analysis of one of the most important battles in history

About The Author
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Philip Warner (1914-2000) enlisted in the Royal Corps of Signals after graduating from St Catherine's, Cambridge in 1939. He fought in Malaya and spent 1,100 days as 'a guest of the Emperor' in Changi and on the Railway of Death, an experience he never discussed. He was a legendary figure to generations of cadets during his thirty years as a Senior Lecturer at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst. Yet he will arguably be best remembered for his contribution of more than 2,000 obituaries of prominent army figures to The Daily Telegraph.

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