RAF Evaders

The Complete Story of RAF Escapees and their Escape Lines, Western Europe, 1940-1945

Oliver Clutton-Brock

 
Date Published :
February 2009
Publisher :
Grub Street Publishing
Language:
English
Illustration :
16 pages photos on art paper
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Hardback
ISBN : 9781906502171
Pages : 448
Dimensions : 6.75 X 9.75 inches
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+
In stock
$59.95

Overview
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During the five years from May 1940 to May 1945 several thousand Allied airmen, forced to abandon their aircraft behind enemy lines, evaded capture and reached freedom, by land, sea and air.

The territory held by the Germans was immense - from Norway and Denmark in the north, through Holland, Belgium, Luxembourg to the south of France - and initially there was no organization to help the men on the run. The first one to assist the evaders and escapers ("E & E” as the Americans called them) was the PAT line, along the Mediterranean coast to Perpignan and down the Spanish border; named after a naval officer Pat O' Leary, from 1942 it became the PAO line.

Next was the Comet line, from Brussels to the Pyrenees. Thousands of brave people were to be involved for whom, if caught, the penalty was death. Theirs is a stirring and awe-inspiring story. Respected historian Oliver Clutton-Brock has researched in depth this secret world of evasion, uncovering some treachery and many hitherto unpublished details, operations and photos.

It is a tremendous reference work, written in his own colorful style with numerous anecdotes, which fills a gap of knowledge formerly unavailable to historians, professional or amateur. Packed with information, key figure biographies and listings - 2,094 evaders identified - this is a valuable testimony to the courage of all those involved.

About The Author
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Oliver Clutton-Brock, born in London three weeks before the end of the Second World War, spent the first 17 years of his life in Lincoln, surrounded by many of Bomber Command’s now historic airfields. Early aviation memories are of four-engined aircraft always flying overhead, searchlights, and a trip in a DH Rapide from RAF Scampton on Battle of Britain Day sometime in the fifties.Educated at Windermere (swimming in the cold lake is a painful memory!) and then at Shrewsbury School, where his studies took second place to sport, he left in 1963 and had a variety of jobs before joining the Civil Service in London in 1969. He took early retirement – they made him an offer he couldn’t refuse – in January 1997.

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