The Zeppelin Offensive

A German Perspective in Pictures & Postcards

David Marks

‘Fly, Zeppelin! Help us in the war. Fly to England, England shall be destroyed by fire. Zeppelin, fly!' Such was the hymn which the children sang; such the refrain which greeted the aged inventor, Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin, wherever he went.
Date Published :
January 2020
Publisher :
Air World
Language:
English
Illustration :
100 color illustrations
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Paperback
ISBN : 9781526737199
Pages : 168
Dimensions : 9.5 X 6.5 inches
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Not Yet Published. Available for Pre-Order
$29.95

Overview
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‘Fly, Zeppelin! Help us in the war. Fly to England, England shall be destroyed by fire. Zeppelin, fly!’ Such was the hymn which the children sang; such the refrain which greeted the aged inventor, Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin, wherever he went. Why was there this reaction across Germany? How did a handful of aircraft giving pleasure cruises become a fearsome fleet of rapacious giants encouraged to punish Germany’s enemies? What were the images that became part of the public’s wartime consciousness?

Books on the Zeppelin raids during the First World War have, traditionally, focused on the direct impact of Britain, from the devastating effects on undefended towns and cities, the psychological impact of this first weapon of total war to the technological and strategic advances that eventually defeated the ‘Baby Killers.' Now, drawing on the largest postcard collection of its kind and other period memorabilia, David Marks tells the story of the Zeppelin during the First World War from a viewpoint that has rarely been considered: Germany itself.

From its maiden flight in July 1900, the Zeppelin evolved into a symbol of technology and national pride that, once war was declared, was at the forefront of German’s propaganda campaign. The Zeppelin links the rampant xenophobia at the outbreak of the conflict against England (it almost never called Britain), France, Russia and their allies to the political doctrines of the day. The postcards that profusely illustrate this book show the wide-ranging types of propaganda from strident Teutonic imagery, myths and legends, biting satire and a surprising amount of humor. This book is a unique contribution to our understanding of the place of the Zeppelin in Germany’s culture and society during the First World War.

About The Author
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David Marks lives and works in London. He is a member of the Airship Heritage Trust and a committee member of Cross & Cockade International (The First World War Aviation Historical Society). He regularly lectures on behalf these organizations on the subject of Zeppelin raids on Britain, drawing on a unique and extensive collection of postcards and contemporary memorabilia. David also writes Cross & Cockade’s quarterly email newsletter, Wind in the Wires, which has over 1,250 subscribers. In 2016, David was proud to be a member of the committee set up by the Northaw & Cuffley Parish Council to commemorate the centenary of the shooting down of airship SL11 by Lieutenant William Leefe Robinson, who won the Victoria Cross for his bravery. David is also a regular contributor to many books, journals, magazines and projects relating to Zeppelin raids, the war in the air, as well as the First World War in general. His first book, Let the Zeppelins Come, focusing on the morale boosting impact of comic postcards to the British public, was published in March 2017 and received national press coverage.

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