War of Intervention in Angola

Volume 5 - Angolan and Cuban Air Forces, 1987-1992

Adrien Fontanellaz, Tom Cooper, José Augusto Matos

Through late 1987, the battlefields of southern Angola moved ever further away from the border to South-West Africa (Namibia), until the show-down between the Soviet-supported government in Luanda and South African-supported insurgency of UNITA culminated in the Battle of Cuito Cuanavale.
Date Published :
October 2022
Publisher :
Helion and Company
Language:
English
Series :
Africa@War
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Binding. : Paperback
ISBN : 9781915070555
Pages : 80
Dimensions : 11.75 X 8.25 inches
Stock Status : Not Yet Published. Available for Pre-Order
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$29.95

Overview
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Through late 1987, the battlefields of southern Angola moved ever further away from the border to South-West Africa (Namibia), until the show-down between the Soviet-supported government in Luanda and South African-supported insurgency of UNITA culminated in the Battle of Cuito Cuanavale. Initially reluctant to become involved, the Cubans reinforced their contingent in Angola, and then decided to force Pretoria into negotiations about mutual withdrawal. Ironically, while Cuba and South Africa eventually agreed to withdraw their troops from the Angolan War, and then did so, in 1988-1989, the government in Lunda – still supported by the Soviet Union – then reinforced its effort to crush the UNITA. The result were additional large-scale operations, the mass of which evaded attention outside Angola, because dramatic developments in Europe not only distracted attention, but also ended the decades-long stand-off between the East and the West. Ultimately, the II Angolan War ended with a cease-fire – hurriedly agreed amid a near-collapse of the government forces, and rapid advances of the UNITA.

About The Author
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Adrien Fontanellaz, from Switzerland, is a military history researcher and author. He developed a passion for military history at an early age and has progressively narrowed his studies to modern-day conflicts. He is a member of the Scientific Committee of the Pully-based Centre d’histoire et de prospective militaries (Military History and Prospectives Center), and regularly contributes for the Revue Militaire Suisse and various French military history magazines. He is co-founder and a regular contributor to the French military history website L’autre cotè de la colline.

Tom Cooper is an Austrian aerial warfare analyst and historian. Following a career in worldwide transportation business – during which he established a network of contacts in the Middle East and Africa – he moved into narrow-focus analysis and writing on small, little-known air forces and conflicts, about which he has collected extensive archives. This has resulted in specialization in such Middle Eastern air forces as of those of Egypt, Iran, Iraq, and Syria, plus various African and Asian air forces. Except for authoring and co-authoring more than 30 books - including about a dozen of titles for Helion’s @War series - and over 1000 articles, Cooper is a regular correspondent for multiple defense-related publications.

José Matos is an independent researcher in military history in Portugal with a primary interest in operations of the Portuguese Air Force during the colonial wars in Africa, especially in Guinea. He is a regular contributor to numerous European magazines on military aviation and naval subjects, and has collaborated in the major project ‘The Air Force at the end of the Empire’, published in Portugal in 2018. This is his first instalment for Helion.

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