The Easter Offensive, Vietnam 1972. Volume 2

Tanks in the streets

Albert Grandolini

On 30 March 1972, while peace negotiations had been dragging on for four years in Paris, the North Vietnamese launched a wide scale offensive in order to break the stalemate. At that date, practically no American ground forces remained in South Vietnam where a limited offensive was expected in the Central Highlands area. But nobody imagined the mag
Date Published :
July 2015
Publisher :
Helion and Company
Language:
English
Series :
Asia@War
Illustration :
c 150 color and b/w photos, color profiles, maps
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Paperback
ISBN : 9781910294086
Pages : 72
Dimensions : 11.5 X 8.25 inches
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+
Available
$29.95

Overview
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On 30 March 1972, while peace negotiations had been dragging on for four years in Paris, the North Vietnamese launched a wide scale offensive in order to break the stalemate. At that date, practically no American ground forces remained in South Vietnam where a limited offensive was expected in the Central Highlands area. But nobody imagined the magnitude of the multidivisional, armor led onslaught. The blow fell first across the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the North from South Vietnam (see Volume 1). Following from the initial attack, in a surprise move, three communist divisions with T-54 tanks attacked from their sanctuaries in Cambodia just north of Saigon. Their tanks ventured into the streets of An Loc City where they were checked by a desperate and heroic stand by the South Vietnamese soldiers and their American advisers, thus saving the capital of South Vietnam.

Finally, the third prong of the North Vietnamese offensive swept across the northern Central Highlands, destroying a whole South Vietnamese division. The communists then resumed their advance, but their tanks were again entangled in street fighting, this time inside Kontum City. Furthermore, they were harassed by newly developed helicopter gun ships armed with antitank missiles. This volume not only details the combat taking place in these two areas but also the organization of both the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) in the South and the People’s Army of Vietnam (PAVN) in the North. It particularly emphasizes the transformation of the former from a mainly infantry force into a modern motorized force. It also describes how the North Vietnamese learnt the hard way about the use of their tanks.

The author relies on not only American archives but also on Vietnamese sources, from both sides. The book contains 130 photos, five maps and 18 color profiles.

Asia@War - following on from our highly successful Africa@War series, Asia@War replicates the same format - concise, incisive text, rare images and high quality color artwork providing fresh accounts of both well-known and more esoteric aspects of conflict in this part of the world since 1945.

About The Author
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Military historian and aviation-journalist Albert Grandolini was born in Vietnam and gained an MA in history from Paris 1 Sorbonne University. His primary research focus is on contemporary conflicts in general and particularly on the military history in Asia and Africa. Having spent his childhood in South Vietnam, the Vietnam War has always been one of his main fields of research. He authored the book Fall of the Flying Dragon: South Vietnamese Air Force (1973-1975) two volumes on Vietnam’s Easter Offensive of 1972 for Helion’s Asia@War Series, and three volumes on Libyan Air Wars for Africa@War Series, and has written numerous articles for various British, French, and German magazines.

REVIEWS
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“Stunning in its magnitude.”

- Argunners Magazine

“Like Grandolini's first part, it's packed with absorbing anecdotes and fascinating facts… dozens of illustrations augment this admirable account – including at least 130 photos and six maps. Eighteen superb color profiles by Tom Cooper – 12 aircraft and six armored vehicles – provide potent model project inspiration. And Grandolini's selected bibliography – full of superb sources for further study – neatly wraps things up… Robustly recommended.”

- Cybermodeler

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