The Nomonhan War 1939

Soviet-Japanese Clash at the Khalkhin Gol

Brendan Hulley

Following the Japanese occupation of Manchuria, in 1931, Japan turned its interest to nearby Soviet territories. The result was a series of border incidents - starting with the Battle of Lake Khasan in 1938. Maintaining that the border between their proxy-state, Manchukuo, and the Soviet-dominated Mongolian People's Republic was the Khalkhyn Gol (o
Date Published :
November 2021
Publisher :
Helion and Company
Language:
English
Series :
Asia@War
Illustration :
120 photos, 15 artworks, 5-6 maps, 4-5 diags
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Binding. : Paperback
ISBN : 9781911628668
Pages : 80
Dimensions : 11.75 X 8.25 inches
Stock Status : Not Yet Published. Available for Pre-Order
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$29.95

Overview
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During the first half of the 20th Century, the former Czarist Russia and then the former Soviet Union, and the Empire of Japan fought a series of undeclared wars in the Far East. The first of these, fought 1904-1905 over rival imperial ambitions in Manchuria and Korea, ended in a clear-cut Japanese victory.

Following the Japanese occupation of Manchuria, in 1931, Japan turned its interest to nearby Soviet territories. The result was a series of border incidents – starting with the Battle of Lake Khasan in 1938. Maintaining that the border between their proxy-state, Manchukuo, and the Soviet-dominated Mongolian People’s Republic was the Khalkhyn Gol (or Khalkha River), the Japanese deployed some of best units of their army to occupy and secure this area.

Following a military build-up, a series of bitter clashes took place mid-May and June 1939, after which the Japanese launched an all-out assault in July. Due to heavy casualties, the battle resulted in a stalemate.

Concerned about the possibility of facing a two-front war, the Soviets reacted with a major counter-offensive, in August 1939, and defeated the Japanese.

While little known in the West, this short but bitter war – known as Nomohan Incident in Japan, or the Battle of Khalkhyn Gol in the Soviet Union – was a crucial overture for the subsequent World War II. Having secured its border in the Far East, the Soviet Union was free to concentrate on war in Europe. Although continuing to underestimate their opponents, the Japanese introduced a major reform of their army. Furthermore, after realizing the massive material disparity vis-à-vis the former USSR, Tokyo joined the Axis with Nazi Germany and Italy.

About The Author
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Brendan Hulley is a writer with a career as a forensic accountant and auditor for the Australian Federal Government. With a father who was a proud officer of the Australian Army, he grew up reading through his father’s rich library of military books. Having lived, worked, and studied in Japan for a number of years, Brendan developed a great passion for the history of that country. Except for attending the Doshisha University in Kyoto, he developed his Japanese language skill while speaking to Okinawans and mainland Japanese about their wartime experiences. Drawing on his experiences in Japan and his investigative career, Brendan has written two novels set in Japan under the pen-name Brendan O’Conor. He has also published a volume of short stories, with a second to be published soon. Brendan Hulley holds Bachelors’ Degrees in Japanese and Finance, and a Masters Degree in Taxation, Accounting, and Forensic Accounting. He is a Chartered Accountant and is currently completing his PhD in Deception Indicators at the University of Wollongong. This is his first instalment for Helion.

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