The Royal Navy in the Napoleonic Age

Senior Service, 1800–1815

Mark Jessop

In 1801 the newly forged United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland commenced life at war with France and her allies and remained so until 1815. After 1812 she had to shoulder the extra burden of a war against the United States of America. With conflict on multiple fronts, hardships continued to be inflicted at home. Trade was made precarious.
Date Published :
February 2020
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Language:
English
Illustration :
32 black and white illustrations
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Hardback
ISBN : 9781526720375
Pages : 176
Dimensions : 9.25 X 6 inches
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Not Yet Published. Available for Pre-Order
$39.95

Overview
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In 1801 the newly forged United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland commenced life at war with France and her allies and remained so until 1815. After 1812 she had to shoulder the extra burden of a war against the United States of America. With conflict on multiple fronts, hardships continued to be inflicted at home. Trade was made precarious. People became bone-weary of hostilities and the threat of invasion ran high.

Napoléon Bonaparte was no ordinary opponent, and the United States navy showed the world the worth of her ships, but what stood in their way was the Royal Navy. Despite notable losses, after the victory of Trafalgar in 1805 she dominated the seas. Although not the only means, her warships were the nation’s first line of defense that helped keep British shores safe.

As the era ended it was obvious the navy had to change. Steam began to alter perspectives with new opportunities. From the vantage point of later decades it could be seen what the Royal Navy had once been and still was. A naval superpower. Britain’s oldest continual military force. The senior service.

About The Author
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Mark Jessop was a communicator in the Royal Navy at the time of the Falklands War, served multiple times in the Gulf, and did a tour of the Far East. Based in some of the largest British naval dockyards and having served on three frigates, he came to see not only the importance of yard workers and ships, but also just what it takes to maintain a Naval fleet. He has taught philosophy, theology, and enterprise. With a deep interest in military history, geography and art, he is keen to honour the heroes (both named and unnamed) of the age of sail and to bring their stories to life.

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