The Somme also including The Coward

A.D. Gristwood

Unflinching descriptions of life in the trenches and the horrors of battle in WWI characterise these two dark novellas, written under the tutelage of H. G Wells.
Date Published :
June 2016
Publisher :
Casemate
Contributor(s) :
H. G. Wells
Language:
English
Series :
Casemate Classic War Fiction
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Paperback
ISBN : 9781612003801
Pages : 208
Dimensions : 7.5 X 5.2 inches
-
+
In stock
$14.95

Overview
-

‘The million British dead have left no books behind. What they felt as they died hour by hour in the mud, or were choked horribly with gas, or relinquished their reluctant lives on stretchers, no witness tells. But here is a book that almost tells it……Mr Gristwood has had the relentless simplicity to recall things as they were; he was as nearly dead as he could be without dying, and he has smelt the stench of his own corruption. This is the story of millions of men – of millions.’ – H. G. Wells, from the preface

In The Somme and its companion The Coward, first published in 1927, the heroics of war and noble self-sacrifice are completely absent; replaced by the gritty realism of life in WWI for the ordinary soldier, and the unflinching portrayal of the horrors of war. Written under the guidance of the master storyteller H. G. Wells, they are classics of the genre.

The Somme revolves around a futile attack in 1916 during the Somme campaign. Everitt, the central protagonist is wounded and moved back through a series of dressing stations to the General Hospital at Rouen. Both in and out of the line he behaves selfishly and unheroically, but in a manner with which it is hard for the reader not to identify. Based on A D Gristwood’s own wartime experiences, critics have said that few other accounts of the war give such an accurate picture of trench life.

The Coward concerns a man who shoots himself in the hand to escape the war, during the March 1918 retreat – an offense punishable by death. He gets away with it, but is haunted by fear of discovery and self-loathing.

About The Author
-

Arthur Donald Gristwood was born in 1893. He enlisted in 1915, joining the 5th London Regiment. He was later discharged due to injuries. After the war, Gristwood struck up a friendship with H. G. Wells, who was impressed by his writing and encouraged him. Through Well’s influence, the book was published by Jonathan Cape in 1927. He committed suicide in 1933.

Herbert George Wells (1866 – 1946) was an English author now best known for his science-fiction novels, which include "The Time Machine", "The First Men in the Moon" and "The Invisible Man".

More from this publisher