The Submarine Six

Australian Naval Heroes

Tom Lewis

Naval conflicts take place often far from our shores. Ships and men sometimes disappear to leave only mystery in their wake. In the 1990s the Royal Australian Navy broke with tradition and for the first time named six submarines after naval heroes. This book shows the true depths of their acheivements.
Date Published :
April 2011
Publisher :
Avonmore Books
Language:
English
Illustration :
fully illustrated, color
Price
Binding. : Paperback
ISBN : 9780987151919
Pages : 202
Dimensions : 9.84 X 6.93 inches
Stock Status : Out of stock
$24.95

Overview
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Naval conflicts take place often far from our shores. Ships and men sometimes disappear to leave only mystery in their wake. In the 1990s the Royal Australian Navy broke with tradition and for the first time named six submarines after naval heroes. This book shows the true depths of their achievements. These were men whose warrior exploits stand alongside those of any other nations. But they have been largely unrecognized, save for those submarines.

Captain Hec Waller, for example, fought to the end in HMAS Perth, alongside fellow cruiser HMAS Houston. The Houston’s Captain Rooks was deservedly awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, America’s highest honor. Captain Waller, by comparison, was given distinction, but not of the highest rank. Should he have been given the Victoria Cross?

Other heroes stand alongside him:
Emile Dechaineux, hero of Dunkirk and the North Sea, battling it out against Japanese Kamikaze attack.
John Collins, taking HMAS Sydney to victory against Italian cruisers.
Hal Farncomb – the first Australian to command an aircraft carrier, in action off the French coast.

But The Submarine Six also examines whether two more of its men deserve futher honor:
Teddy Sheean, tenacious gunner from Tasmania, fought to the end in HMAS Armidale.
Robert Rankin commanded HMAS Yarra against fearful odds, dying in defense of his convoy, attacked by overwhelming Japanese forces.

Are they also VC candidates?

About The Author
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Dr. Tom Lewis served for 20 years in the Royal Australian Navy, during which time he saw active service in Baghdad, where he led American forces, and East Timor. As a museum director he led two museums to new success; the Royal Australian Naval College Historical Collection at HMAS Creswell – for which services he received an Order of Australia; and the Darwin Military Museum, where he was Director for five years. He holds a master’s degree in Cold War Politics from University of Queensland and a Ph.d.in Strategic Studies from Charles Darwin University.

Tom was awarded the Order of Australia Medal in 2003 for services to naval history. Further decorations include the Australian Active Service Medal; the Iraq Campaign Medal, and the United States Army Commendation Medal.

Tom is in popular demand from radio and television stations across the globe for his insightful comments on military history and how it intersects with modern-day life. He is a regular speaker to community groups, and appears often in TV documentaries, including lately with Neil Oliver in Coasts, and in Sir Tony Robinson’s Tour of Duty. He produced with Military Myths Defeated the documentary of The Borella Ride, the Anzac Centenary commemoration of Lieutenant Albert Borella VC, who rode 1000 kilometres in the Northern Territory Wet Season to sign up for the Great War. Tom was the Lead Historian for the Ride. Albert Borella VC, an Incredible Journey screened nationally in Australia on Channel 9. He was also Historian for the 2017 Northern Territory Government project The Territory Remembers, the commemoration of 75 years since the first enemy attacks on Australia. He lives in Darwin, Australia with his wife.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
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Glossary

Acknowledgement

Preface

Foreword, by Vice Admiral Russell Crane, plus acronyms

The Naval World of the 1940s

Collins

Farncomb

Dechaineux

Waller

Rankin

Sheean

Epilogue

REVIEWS
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"A most readable account of the lives of six men who gave so much and have, in the main, been had their deeds unrecognised. Submarine Six has placed before us the incredible deeds of men most Australians have never heard of."

- Royal United Services Institute of Victoria

‘’This very high-quality production is filled with anecdotes from witnesses, RAN personal reports, maps, excellent black and white photographs and all six submarines in colour plates. A most readable account of the lives of six men who gave so much and have, in the main, been had their deeds unrecognised. Submarine Six has placed before us the incredible deeds of men most Australians have never heard of.’’

- The Royal United Services Institute of Victoria

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