The Zulu Wars

The War Despatches Series

John Grehan, Martin Mace

The events at Rorke's Drift, the iconic defense of a mission station by a small force of British and colonial troops, were immortalized in the 1964 film Zulu. In January 1879, a small garrison of just over 150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the mission against a force of 3,000 to 4,000 Zulu warriors. The fierce, but piecemeal, Zu
Date Published :
July 2014
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Language:
English
Illustration :
16 b/w Pics
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Hardback
ISBN : 9781781593226
Pages : 256
Dimensions : 9 X 6 inches
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In stock
$34.95

Overview
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The events at Rorke’s Drift, the iconic defense of a mission station by a small force of British and colonial troops, were immortalized in the 1964 film Zulu. In January 1879, a small garrison of just over 150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the mission against a force of 3,000 to 4,000 Zulu warriors. The fierce, but piecemeal, Zulu attacks on Rorke’s Drift came very close to defeating the defenders but were ultimately repelled. Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders.

The battle at Rorke’s Drift was an early engagement in the Zulu War. Lasting between January and July 1879. Noted for several particularly bloody battles, including a stunning opening victory by the Zulu at Battle of Isandlwana, as well as for being a landmark in the timeline of imperialism in the region the war ended in a British victory and the end of the Zulu nation’s independence.

This unique collection of original accounts will prove to be an invaluable resource for historians, students and all those interested in what was one of the most significant periods in British military history.

About The Author
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Captain Graeme Chamley Wynne was born in 1889. He was commissioned into the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry in 1907. Climbing through the ranks, he was serving in the 2nd Battalion at the outbreak of war in 1914. As part of the British Expeditionary Force he was captured by the Germans at Le Cateau on 26 August 1914. Wynne was employed by the Historical Section, Committee of Imperial Defence (later the Historical Section, Cabinet Office) between 1918 and 1956. It was in this role that he completed the report published in this book on 19 May 1948.

Martin Mace has been involved in writing and publishing military history for more than twenty-five years. He began his career with local history, writing a book on the Second World War anti-invasion defences and stop lines in West Sussex. Following the success of this book, he established Historic Military Press, which has published a wide range of titles. In 2006 he began working on the idea for Britain at War Magazine, the first issue of which went on sale in May 2007. This publication has grown rapidly to become the best-selling military history periodical on the high street. Martin now devotes his time to writing and editing books.

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