American Infantry Weapons of the Second World War

Michael Green

During the arduous campaigns in theaters of war from the Pacific to North West Europe, American infantry weapons played a key role in the eventual victory over the Axis forces. In so doing they earned a special reputation for ruggedness and reliability. In addition to being used by US ground forces they were widely adopted by other Allied nations
Date Published :
February 2016
Publisher :
Pen and Sword
Language:
English
Series :
Images of War
Illustration :
Color and b&w
Format Available    QuantityPrice
Paperback
ISBN : 9781473827226
Pages : 200
Dimensions : 9.69 X 7.44 inches
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In stock
$24.95

Overview
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During the arduous campaigns in theaters of war from the Pacific to North West Europe, American infantry weapons played a key role in the eventual victory over the Axis forces. In so doing they earned a special reputation for ruggedness and reliability. In addition to being used by US ground forces they were widely adopted by other Allied nations.

Expert author Michael Green puts the full range of small arms, be they rifles, submachine guns, shotguns, pistols, machine guns as well as mortars, anti-tank weapons and close infantry support artillery under the microscope.

Many names such as the Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) and the incomparable semiautomatic Garand will be well known whereas others (the Johnson Rifle and Reising SMG) are not. The typically informative text completes the wide range of photographic images.

About The Author
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Michael Green is the author of numerous acclaimed books in the Images of War series. He lives in California.

REVIEWS
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"The book looks at everything from pistols to flame throwers and from rifles to anti-tank guns. There is an additional section at the end looking at the bigger kit rounded up in the infantry support weapon category and all in all the package offers a lot of bang for your buck.  I think you knew I might say that! This is another well-executed history from a consistently trustworthy author. I have no hesitation in pressing the ‘like’ button with this one."

- War History Online

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